Research trip to Copenhagen for installation work for late 2018, which will be part of the permanent exhibition for the Museum of Copenhagen; curated by Jakob Parby and architect Johan Carlsson, from JAC studios.  Johan Carlsson curated an earlier wall installation called “A place of Contemplation” which was at RACA gallery in 2005, which will now be part of the Museum of Copenhagen. The installation is part of the theme of public resistance, and the resulting difference alternative communities which formed in Copenhagen over the last 20 years.














A plasterboard and timber frame was built and placed across the threshold of two spaces within the gallery. Instructions were given to paint the object the color of the most influential feature of the surrounding space; since the galley was in a park, it was painted green. Using a bushwhacking knife one surface of the wall was then disrupted using a motion like that used when cutting through dense brush in a forest. The reverse side of the frame featured a pink plasticine work by Alex Schady.

Stichting Outline, Amsterdam 2003













Artists book Killing I  in new Publication;

Fur: A Sensitive History by Jonathan Faiers

A groundbreaking, informative, and thought-provoking exploration of fur’s fashionable and controversial history the first and only book of its kind, Fur: A Sensitive History looks at the impact of fur on society, art, politics, and, of course, fashion.

Published by Yale University Press, 2020

Jonathan Faiers is professor of fashion thinking at Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton.














Solo Exhibition of Artists books at Camberwell College of Art, University of the Arts, London, 2017














My Artist book in Publication by Stephen Bury: Artists’ Books

London, Bernard Quaritch Ltd, 2015.

The history of artists’ involvement with the book format between 1963 and 2000 includes a fascinating range of artists and movements from Mallarméto the Piece of Paper Press via Cubism, Futurism, Dada, Fluxus and conceptual art. This second edition includes updated text with new bibliographic descriptions of 600 key artists’ books and over 130 new, full-page, colour illustrations taken from the internationally renowned Chelsea College of Art & Design Library collection.

Dr Stephen Bury is the Andrew W. Mellon Chief Librarian, Frick Art Reference Library, New York.

Killing I, leopard and Buckram cover, 1988, Chelsea Special Collections, Chelsea College of Art & Design Library collection, UAL, London














A Catalogue of Errors is a large body of photographic prints based on technical anomalies found amongst the negatives I inherited from my father in 1990. 

These negatives drew my attention because of the different puzzling photographic malfunctions and in this work/series as there was a flash/shutter problem with the camera. Indeed, some images only became apparent when printed, making my role one of forensic investigation. 

The anomalies within each photograph acknowledge the materiality of analogue film, particularly in this sequence whereby, although it may look like a collage of two images, the flash/shutter problem resulted in two different exposure in the one frame. 














With sound by Malvern Brume.
Premiered at the Experiments in Cinema Film Festival, New Mexico, USA, 2021

Gaps in the Persistent Hiss is a journey through a landscape both sonically and visually.  Through the combination of experimental music and a handheld binocular lens, the video plays with a radically discontinuous almost hallucinogenic image which reveals a primordial awareness of the world around us.  At times through this binocular lens, the image acts as a sort of mirror expanding the territory of the visible beyond what the individual can directly experience, by reflecting what is behind the lens, then suddenly acts as a sort of hole sucking up the entire visual world into itself.














With sound by John Wynne and Bouche Bee.
Premiered at the Strangelove Film Festival, 2020, UK  

Linescio, like my early film work, consists of sequential experiments investigating links between movement, place and sound, moving in and out of abstraction. Building on the insights of experimental and structural film, this work puts the emphasis on materials, processes, and chance in order to explore concepts of disappearance and impermanence.

Made during an informal residency in Switzerland during the summer of 2020, with sound by artist John Wynne and pan-European avant-garde music group Bouche Bée – Petri Huurinainen, Emmanuelle Waeckerlé, John Eyles.














With sound by Bouche Bée.

Landscape Lens Study exploits the specificities of time and technology, in the spirit of Dziga Vertov’s 1920 film, Man with a Movie Camera, wherein a series of fragments builds into a portrait of landscape and the sensory, psychological, and social dimensions of a virtual world.














With sound by John Wynne.
Premiere for MOCA, London, 2020/2021

Having previously experimented with infinite camera/projector loops, this work explores the “tautological elegance” of visual feedback. Originally performed as a live Zoom intervention for MOCA London, I later added a soundtrack by artist John Wynne. Like much of my work, the intention is to abstract from the visible world in order to transform the viewer’s perceptions of “normal” reality.














This work is one in a series of films I made by attaching a Super-8 camera to various machines or devices:  the visual content of each film is determined solely by the events and actions of the context in which it was made; the duration of each film is determined by the length of one Super-8 cartridge. Here the camera was mounted on a shovel.  The sound is from a cassette tape bought for 25cents from a street vendor in New York City by sound artist John Wynne. 














A Super-8 camera was attached to a jack hammer in London, UK and an invitation was made to the operator of the machine to participate in the making of a film.  The film and the sound were structurally determined by the events and actions of the context in which each was made:  the duration of each film is determined by the length of one Super-8 cartridge with no editing outside the camera.